Further thoughts on the Disability Arts Sector in Ireland

After recovering somewhat from the shock of the Irish Arts Council withdrawing from the ADAI scheme, I finally remembered another piece of news from December that sheds a different light on this decision.

Arts and Disability Ireland announced the Ignite programme, three large-scale commissions of work by professional artists with disabilities for 2014.  I was interested when I first read the headline, “Ignite Commissions Announced: Largest ever investment in Ireland’s arts and disability sector”.  But I felt a bit let down as I read the accompanying press release, since it wasn’t a call for submissions, but an announcement of a fait accomplis.  Three established professional artists with disabilities have already been commissioned to produce high-profile works with community groups of people with disabilities in Cork, Galway and Mayo.

I have no wish to take away from the importance of high-profile professional art created in Ireland.  But it now appears that this project has been undertaken instead of continuing to support a range of artists with disabilities in progressing their careers.  With the withdrawal of the Irish Arts Council from the cross-border Arts and Disability Awards Ireland, there is no longer a support mechanism for those of us who are not yet (nor may ever be) in a position to work full-time as artists and get international recognition.

This got me thinking about an issue that has nagged at me since my days at university.  People with disabilities are not expected to have careers.  Some of us may get jobs, but we are not presumed to have a specialist skill-set, personal ambition or take a hand in deciding just what we want to do with our lives.  For example, an employment scheme set up by government agencies to “encourage” employers to take on one of these dregs of society is structured on the assumption that an employee with disabilities will be between 50% and 80% as productive as employees without disabilities.  The scheme is designed to compensate employers for the inevitable loss of productivity associated with taking on a lesser person. This precludes the possibility of an employee with disabilities being either as productive or even more productive than other workers.

The shift of focus from the Irish Arts Council from supporting career development to high-profile projects, which involve only 3 artists who are already established in their arts careers, is another example of the neglect of people with disabilities’ wishes and ambitions.  I feel that this initiative is a way of making it look as though we have a thriving disability arts sector while simultaneously withdrawing the means for developing that sector.  This feeling is intensified by the structure of the Ignite commissions, where the work will be created alongside voluntary participants from community-based disability groups.  The majority of us are expected to be participants, not leaders or instigators.

Again, while I support the overall work of Arts and Disability Ireland, (the Republic’s counterpart to the Northern Irish Arts and Disability Forum), I have long felt that they have not prioritised supporting the career development of artists with disabilities. Rather, their focus seems to have been on people with disabilities as spectators, audiences, passive consumers of “mainstream” art.  I have no complaint about the availability of audio-described theatre productions, (even if they are mostly in Dublin and mostly mainstream popular shows), but this does reinforce the vision of people with disabilities as a passive, homogenous mass without individual tastes and desires.

It’s unsurprising, since most impoverished and excluded groups are treated this way by a thoughtless “mainstream”.  Gay men are not expected to have various tastes in clothing and music. Moslem women are not expected to have differing opinions about their role in society. The poor everywhere are expected to take the scraps they’re given and be pathetically grateful. So while it may not seem as though this move by the Irish Arts Council and Arts and Disability Ireland will affect many people, it is nonetheless symptomatic of an out-dated attitude from which we in Ireland have never really broken free.

Advertisements

Arts Pilgrimage – Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman

I have just returned from two nights in London, largely on my own.  For anyone who’s travelled with a disability, you’ll know what a big deal that is.  Every micrometre of the journey had to be planned in advance; not just booking tickets and accommodation, but having to ring each company involved to check the level of accessibility.  And even with all that planning, it still wasn’t a straightforward journey.  not the worst I’ve been on by a long shot, but convoluted.
In preparing for the journey, I came across this incredible web site:
http://www.describe-online.com/
Their aim is to provide “access through information”, and they give detailed text descriptions of train stations, airports and other public areas around the UK.  Even if you’re not a VIP (Visually Impaired Person), have a look at it to see a model of Real Access.
The sole purpose of my journey was to visit Grayson Perry’s exhibition, “Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman” in the British Museum.  Despite winning the Turner Prize a few years back, Perry is a sincere, witty and humble artist and maker.  His primary medium is ceramics, but in this show, he uses textiles, iron casting and a variety of other techniques.
The show covers so much, it’s hard to know where or how to start describing it.  He has made and revived a number of pieces which are displayed alongside artefacts from the British Museum’s own collection.  It celebrates the craftspeople and anonymous artists throughout history and across the world, whose works are most usually seen as a impersonal expression of their culture or period of history.  But it also explores the role of the craftsperson in creating and subverting myth, religion, gender and power.  At the core of Perry’s work is his 50 year old teddy bear, Alan Measles, who has the role of symbolic father and personal god.
In one interview about the exhibition, Perry describes two elements of his nature as “the punk” and “the hobbit”.  The punk is the subverter, the over-turner, the irreverend, socio-politically aware commentator; the hobbit loves beautiful things, opulence, tradition, fine skill and rich materials.  It’s a mix that really appeals to me.
One central theme of the exhibition is that of pilgrimage.  The once-in-a-lifetime journey one makes to rekindle inspiration and meaning by being present to a special place or object.  Perry examines the role of the contemporary artist as the saint or demi-god, with galleries as great cathedrals of cultural orthodoxy.  The situation of the collection within the British Museum is central to this theme, with the museum itself represented as a destination of pilgrimage.  As such, Perry has disassociated his work from those who seek to elevate the status of their work by placing it in the sanctified gallery-space, and instead placing it alongside the global heterogeneous traditions of the world’s crafts.So I had to make my own pilgrimage to experience this exhibition in its proper time and place.  Here are some thoughts I had along the way.

Day 1:

Day 2: