If you hear anyone complaining about the strike in UK’s Southern Rail, let me share three experiences i have had on driver-only operated trains.

1: On the Stanstead Express, the doors closed on my guide dog. She jumped forward onto the platform and the door closed onto my arm. I was just realising i would have to let go of the lead and leave her alone on the platform when the assistance i had booked spotted us and screamed at the driver to stop.
2: On a DART in Dublin, no assistance showed up to get me off the train. I hadn’t been put in a designated wheelchair space, so had no access to an emergency intercom. I was left on the train until it reached the terminus and the train was abandoned. I rang the station i had started, and eventually i was taken off the train and put in a taxi to get to my destination.
3: My local train station is often unstaffed as a “cost-cutting” measure, especially for the earliest and latesttrains. Thes trains are also the ones which don’t carry ticket inspectors, so the driver is the only Iarnrod Eireann employee around. One evening, a young driver did his best to get me onto the train using the ramp used for getting the catering trolley on and off. However, the driver had never used the ramp before, and had probably not been trained to do so. It was the wrong way round, so when my front wheels reached the train, the back wheels pushed the ramp away behind me. The driver managed to catch the back of the chair before it crashed onto the platform. Ever since, i have made double sure of the ramp’s stability before going near it.
For all this, i’m very glad i don’t have to use the next station down the line. Dromod is permanently unstaffed, and has two platforms connected by an overhead footbridge with loads of steps and no lift. If you use a wheelchair and want to use this station, you have to call well in advance so that the train pulls into the right platform.
Fewer staff always leads to worse accessibility.

Updates: MY GOVERNMENT IS KEEPING ME UNDER HOUSE ARREST

Since publishing this blog post on Friday, I have done this radio interview with local station, Ocean FM:

Then, sitting in the doctor’s waiting room this evening, I heard this segment on RTE Radio 1’s Drivetime:

DriveTime – RTE Radio 1 – Monday 22nd August: Home Care Services

I have e-mailed the programme to point out the connection between the two stories. However, I don’t use Twitter! So please feel free to tweet @DriveTimeRTE

ORIGINAL POST:

Here is a letter I sent to the Physical and Sensory Disability service in the North-West this week:

 

12th August, 2016

Re: Emergency increase in Personal Assistance hours for client with multiple disabilities

To whom it may concern:

I am writing to request an urgent increase in Personal Assistance (PA) hours until early 2017. I am visually impaired and have restricted physical mobility, meaning that I need to use a guide dog and a powerchair to leave my own house for medical appointments, shopping, banking and participating in society. I have outlined the nature of my disabilities and their impact on my daily life in the attached Disability Impact Statement, and my specific requirements from a Personal Assistant in the attached form.

My current guide dog has had to retire due to health concerns. Due to my unusual set of needs, a succession dog will not be available to work with me until early 2017. This leaves me with severely restricted mobility in the interim.

As well as providing sighted guidance for mobility outside the home, my specially-trained dog provided additional mobility assistance within the home. The loss of this essential part of my independent living toolkit therefore has a significant and acute impact on my daily life.

I live alone, and currently have 15 PA hours per week, which are almost entirely used for assistance with personal care, housework and, to a minimal degree, accessing print materials within my own home. I already have very limited access to any assistance with transport or tasks outside the home. Having no assistance dog now means I am restricted to a few essential journeys very close to home (within 1-2 km) on familiar routes with good environmental accessibility.

In my current situation, I cannot visit my parents in Dublin, visit any friends’ houses or participate in many recommended theraputic activities e.g. a group singing project organised by the mental health service to which I was referred by the occupational therapist. If I drop, spill or break something on the floor, I may have to wait for 23 hours before a PA is available to clear it up or find essential items for me. When I need to make a medical appointment, I have to wait until a friend with a car is present before I can arrange a time that I can attend.

The interaction of my visual impairment with my mobility impairment means that I am in an unusually challenging position. These impairments combine in unique and often unforeseen ways to create complex barriers to my participation in society and living independently. As such, they should be understood as a form of “third impairment”, with needs distinct from people with only a physical or a sensory disability. The combination of Personal Assistance, powerchair and guide-dog is an essential tool for my independent living. Without that special combination, I am unable to leave my front door by myself. Without a working guide-dog, I urgently need a much higher degree of Personal Assistance to maintain my level of independence.

Thank you for your consideration.

Yours,

Isolde Carmody

 

Within 24 hours of writing that letter, my cat puked somewhere in my bedroom. I couldn’t see where, but boy could I smell it! There would be no PA available to clear it up for me for another 18 hours. Despite keeping my bedroom door closed (the smell was truly awful), my retired guide-dog got in there and helpfully licked up some of the vomit. Since I didn’t know where the vomit was, or whether the dog had eaten all of it, I slept on the sofa that night. The next day, my retired dog was off his food, and had diarrhoea, thankfully in the garden. My PA that morning couldn’t find the vomit, partly because she doesn’t understand animals, so it was 48 hours later that the last of the vomit was cleaned up.

Today, I was told that no new hours had been approved for me. I can’t leave my house. And I won’t be able to go anywhere further than 1 or 2 km until some unspecified time in 2017.

THIS IS ILLEGAL DETENTION

MY GOVERNMENT IS KEEPING ME UNDER HOUSE ARREST

Here is a letter I sent to the Physical and Sensory Disability service in the North-West this week:

 

12th August, 2016

Re: Emergency increase in Personal Assistance hours for client with multiple disabilities

To whom it may concern:

I am writing to request an urgent increase in Personal Assistance (PA) hours until early 2017. I am visually impaired and have restricted physical mobility, meaning that I need to use a guide dog and a powerchair to leave my own house for medical appointments, shopping, banking and participating in society. I have outlined the nature of my disabilities and their impact on my daily life in the attached Disability Impact Statement, and my specific requirements from a Personal Assistant in the attached form.

My current guide dog has had to retire due to health concerns. Due to my unusual set of needs, a succession dog will not be available to work with me until early 2017. This leaves me with severely restricted mobility in the interim.

As well as providing sighted guidance for mobility outside the home, my specially-trained dog provided additional mobility assistance within the home. The loss of this essential part of my independent living toolkit therefore has a significant and acute impact on my daily life.

I live alone, and currently have 15 PA hours per week, which are almost entirely used for assistance with personal care, housework and, to a minimal degree, accessing print materials within my own home. I already have very limited access to any assistance with transport or tasks outside the home. Having no assistance dog now means I am restricted to a few essential journeys very close to home (within 1-2 km) on familiar routes with good environmental accessibility.

In my current situation, I cannot visit my parents in Dublin, visit any friends’ houses or participate in many recommended theraputic activities e.g. a group singing project organised by the mental health service to which I was referred by the occupational therapist. If I drop, spill or break something on the floor, I may have to wait for 23 hours before a PA is available to clear it up or find essential items for me. When I need to make a medical appointment, I have to wait until a friend with a car is present before I can arrange a time that I can attend.

The interaction of my visual impairment with my mobility impairment means that I am in an unusually challenging position. These impairments combine in unique and often unforeseen ways to create complex barriers to my participation in society and living independently. As such, they should be understood as a form of “third impairment”, with needs distinct from people with only a physical or a sensory disability. The combination of Personal Assistance, powerchair and guide-dog is an essential tool for my independent living. Without that special combination, I am unable to leave my front door by myself. Without a working guide-dog, I urgently need a much higher degree of Personal Assistance to maintain my level of independence.

Thank you for your consideration.

Yours,

Isolde Carmody

 

Within 24 hours of writing that letter, my cat puked somewhere in my bedroom. I couldn’t see where, but boy could I smell it! There would be no PA available to clear it up for me for another 18 hours. Despite keeping my bedroom door closed (the smell was truly awful), my retired guide-dog got in there and helpfully licked up some of the vomit. Since I didn’t know where the vomit was, or whether the dog had eaten all of it, I slept on the sofa that night. The next day, my retired dog was off his food, and had diarrhoea, thankfully in the garden. My PA that morning couldn’t find the vomit, partly because she doesn’t understand animals, so it was 48 hours later that the last of the vomit was cleaned up.

Today, I was told that no new hours had been approved for me. I can’t leave my house. And I won’t be able to go anywhere further than 1 or 2 km until some unspecified time in 2017.

THIS IS ILLEGAL DETENTION

We Forgot to Invite You – The Cruelty of Exclusion Through Thoughtlessness

A few years ago, I had a series of nightmares in which I was forgotten. One involved a group of my best friends getting together and going on my favourite radio show, and I heard the broadcast. They thought it would be a great treat for me, but I was deeply distressed that they never thought to invite me to participate in the show itself.

This is a feeling I encounter on a pretty regular basis. I get left out of the things I most want to be involved in because someone – or a whole series of someones – never thought to include me in the activity. Most usually, this is through genuine ignorance or forgetfulness, but that can feel more personally hurtful than explicit prejudice.

This is most often encountered via technology and new media. The scramble to optimise content for smart-phones has left non-visual learners and visually impaired people out of the picture from first principles. What I mean by that is that newer technological interfaces are deeply based on visual interactions. This is in contrast to traditional operating systems which are based on structured text. Text and code are much more open to non-visual representation.

I don’t have a smart-phone. I used to have an amazing mobile phone on the Symbian operating system which was one of the best accessibility aids I’ve ever used. It is irreperably broken now (it’s the motherboard that’s gone!), and I feel like I’ve been left ten years behind the rest of the world. I can no longer get a smart-phone type device without a touch-screen.

There are applications which purport to make touch-screen phones usable by the blind and visually impaired, but I can’t see the value in them. Sending a text message on a touch-screen phone would be like asking a life-long touch-typist (which I also am) to type documents using a point-and-click on-screen keyboard. Now, I know people who have written books using a foot-controlled pointer to pick out words letter-by-letter, but that was thirty years ago. For me, the sensible way to send a text is using the old numeric keypad. It’s galling to be asked to slow down my technological interactions by such a significant factor for the sake of sighted users getting to their information a wee bit quicker.

As my dear friend Felicity Ford put it, the exclusion of non-visual technology users from the smart-tech revolution is equivalent to a shiny new public building going up with flights of steps everywhere. Maybe they will put a ramp in, or maybe wheelies will have to find the servant’s entrance, ring a bell, wait for the back door to be unlocked and negotiate ten minutes of corridors and tiny lifts just to get into the public foyer. And by the time you get into the foyer, you discover that the people you wanted to meet up with have gone out to the smoking area, which is down a fire-escape. You’re left hanging out the door shouting down to your friends. Not the most inclusive feeling in the world.

I encounter both these forms of thoughtless exclusion at least once a day. The one that made me cry most recently was when I was told about a major public meeting discussing the exclusion of women in Irish theatre. I was told about the Dublin-based meeting the day before, and my first concern was that I can’t really travel across the country with less than 24 hours notice. I wouldn’t be able to arrange P.A. time to pack a bag, the train journey would be exhausting and painful, I probably couldn’t book an accessible hotel-room in Dublin less than a week in advance… it’s just not feasible unless I want to be out of commission for a week.

The promotion for this meeting and the associated campaign was largely done via Twitter. I don’t use Twitter. It’s centred around smart-phone users continuously scanning a huge volume of text to pick out relevant details. Any time I’ve encountered tweets over e-mail or other websites, I can’t make any sense of the constant abbreviations, hash-tags, usernames or links to pictures or articles. So I just don’t bother.

When I looked up the associated blog for this campaign, the first thing I discovered was that the tickets for the meeting were already sold out. However, there was a message saying they would try to set up live-streaming for the event, and that there would be tweets sent out over the course of the meeting.

The morning of the meeting, I checked my e-mail and the website to see if there was a link for streaming. There wasn’t. The website said to visit their Twitter feed for links to streaming. I tried going onto Twitter using a web browser, and was utterly overwhelmed by the volume of text, with no clear way of finding the one piece of information I was looking for. Lucky for me, I was on Skype with the wonderful Felix, and even before I asked her, she found the link to the stream.

That link brought me to yet another social media site, but it said I needed Flash to run the streaming (which I already have installed) and suggested using Chrome instead. I don’t know how to use Chrome with JAWS, so I exited Firefox and opened the link with Internet Explorer. There, the page said to try Firefox or Chrome, so I could guess where this chain was leading. It became clear from the streaming site that it was set up to run via smart-phones. The meeting had already been on for half an hour at that point, so I gave up and started to cry.

That was a morning’s work to get nowhere. Five years ago, I would have had it easier. For one thing, web accessibility was all the rage. We had the W3 accessibility guidelines, and companies like Google and Microsoft were busy building in screen-reader features to websites and applications. Then, tablets and smartphones became the huge money-spinner. The sighted world has leapt ahead in terms of communication, information access and entertainment, while non-visual learners find themselves left even further behind than we were in 2010. Assistive technology has come on in leaps and bounds since then, but all the development has had to focus on compensating for an increasingly visual world.

So I repeatedly encounter the feeling that my friends, or potential friends, are throwing these great parties. Some of these parties are upstairs with no lift access. Most of the time, they just forget to invite me.

The Case for Braille

Thanks to the luscious Felicia Day and her Facebook followers, I have just discovered 64 Oz Games. This is a small company creating Braille add-ons for board- and card-games. As well as bringing attention to the service, I wanted to share this particular post about why Braille is the best tool for VIP access to printed materials. It also suggests that the more Braille is available, the more VIPs will learn to use it. This is something I think really needs to be promoted.

In Ireland, services for the visually impaired are still largely constructed on a medical model. I got totally fed up of being encouraged to use my “residual vision”. The assumption was of acquired sight los, and that it was better to be as “normal” as possible, not giving in to the blindness label. This is very close to the approach of doctors and physiotherapists suggesting anything rather than using a wheelchair. That’s even if not using a wheelchair makes you so exhausted and pain-ridden that your life becomes a round of therapy, exercise and pain management, with nothing else to give your life actual meaning. Sure, I could use the vision I have, and take 2 hours to read one page of print, then have to rest for days before reading the next page. I’d much rather read in a non-visual format, using my “residual vision” to appreciate how the sunset looks this evening.

Anyway, Here’s the blog post!

Why Such A Focus on Braille? – 64 oz games

Web Accessibility – why bother?

So you have a working computer, an internet connection and some assistive technology.  That means you can access any webpage, right?

Wrong

It can be hard to explain what “web accessibility” is all about.  I thought I might furnish you with a couple of examples and a couple of general pointers. First, the examples…

Bouncers of the Internet – No blacks, No dogs, No blindies!

I’m sure you will have come across a “captcha” – that image of warpified text that claims to sort the machines from the humans.  Maybe you’ve even had a whinge about how difficult they can be to see.  If you don’t know what I’m on about, here’s an example from a Google page:

Screenshot of a visual captcha window from Google
Google Visual Captcha

I tried to understand the audio alternative about 15 times, then started to record my effort.  Bear in mind that I use JAWS, a screen-reading program that gives me audio feedback about what’s happening on my screen.  Every time you hear the word “Enter” and a slight pause, I have tried to submit my effort.  Instead of hearing the same audio again, a new audio file loads. I will give you some kind of prize if you think you can understand the words in any of the 16 captcha samples on this audio recording:

And that’s assuming the Captcha challenge even has an audio alternative, and that the button to request the audio alternative is tagged so that JAWS can detect it. These are by no means givens.

PDF – the universal format

PDF has come to be a standard way to access all kinds of texts. Sometimes, I receive a PDF attachment to an e-mail, which is supposed to carry all the information the sender wishes to communicate with me. Often, PDFs are used online for brochures and publicity – often graphics-heavy publications. They are also the standard format for academic papers and articles.

PDFs have plenty of accessibility features… if the author of the document has bothered to use them. More often, the author is concerned with how the text looks on the page, with neither thought nor care for the underlying code that orders the text. Weird things can happen to words in the most straightforward documents, with headings read as if each letter were on a separate line.

Here’s an example of how JAWS interacted with a price list for spa treatments. See if you can figure out what any of those treatments were or how much they cost…

Universal Access to All Knowledge?

The biggest kick in the teeth has to be my attempt to continue academic work. There are digital and online resources available now that I would have given selected body parts for when I was still officially a student. At the time, which is over 10 years ago now, I even attended conferences about digital humanities specifically to make known how they would be indispensible from an access point of view.

However, the effectiveness of digitisation varies wildly. The wonderful Internet Archive project, of which I’m a huge fan, still has no accessible means (i.e. keyboard-only) of uploading content. A search result has to be navigated using “G” to find graphics, rather than marking search result headers as headings. And then there’s the quality of the digitised texts themselves…

The quality of OCR (Optical Character Recognition) software seems to have progressed incredibly slowly down the years. Many OCR Engines seem to imagine that long text documents use an awful lot more random punctuation than I’ve ever come across. Exclamation marks (!) often appear instead of letters I and L, and capitalisation seems a matter of taste rather than of syntax. The word “arc” is apparently more commonly used than the word “are”… I could go on. Really. I could.

The fact is, if OCR is to have ANY value, it needs to be proof-read by a human being. Even then, JAWS will pick up the odd lower-case L that has been mistaken for an upper-case I. But just scanning a book and lobbing it up on the internet does not count as “Universal Access to All Knowledge”.

I have no desire to single out the Internet Archive as an offender. As I said, I love the project. It’s what the Internet was sent from Heaven to achieve. The most recent culprit (and I find at least one a week) for bad access I’ve run into (face-first) is Academia.edu. Never mind invisible buttons and menus that can’t easily be reached. Here’s an article I tried to read this evening. Apparently, it’s about Disability Arts. Here’s what JAWS says:

And here’s a few screen shots. I use visual themes on my PC which hurt my eyes less when I need to read the screen (at least I can still do that). The size of the text at the top of the first image should give you an idea of how big it has to be before I can read it. My mum uses similar settings, although she doesn’t use screen-reading software. So this is pretty much what she’d be faced with:

NOTE: This is NOT the fault of contributers to the site. It’s down to the programmers.

First Screenshot showing a paper on Academia.edu

Second Screen shot from a paper on Academia.edu

Third Screen shot from a paper on Academia.edu

Fourth Screen shot from a paper on Academia.edu

Fifth Screen shot from a paper on Academia.edu

That’s all I have the energy for right now. This is a big topic, and it affects me every single day of my life. No doubt, I’ll need to rant on it again soon…

Further thoughts on the Disability Arts Sector in Ireland

After recovering somewhat from the shock of the Irish Arts Council withdrawing from the ADAI scheme, I finally remembered another piece of news from December that sheds a different light on this decision.

Arts and Disability Ireland announced the Ignite programme, three large-scale commissions of work by professional artists with disabilities for 2014.  I was interested when I first read the headline, “Ignite Commissions Announced: Largest ever investment in Ireland’s arts and disability sector”.  But I felt a bit let down as I read the accompanying press release, since it wasn’t a call for submissions, but an announcement of a fait accomplis.  Three established professional artists with disabilities have already been commissioned to produce high-profile works with community groups of people with disabilities in Cork, Galway and Mayo.

I have no wish to take away from the importance of high-profile professional art created in Ireland.  But it now appears that this project has been undertaken instead of continuing to support a range of artists with disabilities in progressing their careers.  With the withdrawal of the Irish Arts Council from the cross-border Arts and Disability Awards Ireland, there is no longer a support mechanism for those of us who are not yet (nor may ever be) in a position to work full-time as artists and get international recognition.

This got me thinking about an issue that has nagged at me since my days at university.  People with disabilities are not expected to have careers.  Some of us may get jobs, but we are not presumed to have a specialist skill-set, personal ambition or take a hand in deciding just what we want to do with our lives.  For example, an employment scheme set up by government agencies to “encourage” employers to take on one of these dregs of society is structured on the assumption that an employee with disabilities will be between 50% and 80% as productive as employees without disabilities.  The scheme is designed to compensate employers for the inevitable loss of productivity associated with taking on a lesser person. This precludes the possibility of an employee with disabilities being either as productive or even more productive than other workers.

The shift of focus from the Irish Arts Council from supporting career development to high-profile projects, which involve only 3 artists who are already established in their arts careers, is another example of the neglect of people with disabilities’ wishes and ambitions.  I feel that this initiative is a way of making it look as though we have a thriving disability arts sector while simultaneously withdrawing the means for developing that sector.  This feeling is intensified by the structure of the Ignite commissions, where the work will be created alongside voluntary participants from community-based disability groups.  The majority of us are expected to be participants, not leaders or instigators.

Again, while I support the overall work of Arts and Disability Ireland, (the Republic’s counterpart to the Northern Irish Arts and Disability Forum), I have long felt that they have not prioritised supporting the career development of artists with disabilities. Rather, their focus seems to have been on people with disabilities as spectators, audiences, passive consumers of “mainstream” art.  I have no complaint about the availability of audio-described theatre productions, (even if they are mostly in Dublin and mostly mainstream popular shows), but this does reinforce the vision of people with disabilities as a passive, homogenous mass without individual tastes and desires.

It’s unsurprising, since most impoverished and excluded groups are treated this way by a thoughtless “mainstream”.  Gay men are not expected to have various tastes in clothing and music. Moslem women are not expected to have differing opinions about their role in society. The poor everywhere are expected to take the scraps they’re given and be pathetically grateful. So while it may not seem as though this move by the Irish Arts Council and Arts and Disability Ireland will affect many people, it is nonetheless symptomatic of an out-dated attitude from which we in Ireland have never really broken free.

Sad News for Irish Artists with Disabilities and Deaf Artists…

I have just received this via e-mail from the Arts and Disability Forum, from whom I am now even more glad to have just received funding! This is a dark day for Disability Arts and artists with disabilities and deaf artists in Ireland.

 

Arts Council of Ireland withdraws from cross border awards scheme

 

A unique cross border scheme which has benefited dozens of disabled and deaf artists has come to an end after An Chomhairle Ealaion, the Arts Council of Ireland announced it was withdrawing its support.

 

The future is now uncertain for disabled and deaf artists as this signals the end of the Arts and Disability Awards Ireland (ADAI) scheme which has allocated £526,274 to 216 projects on the island since its inception.

 

The decision was revealed in a letter to Chris Ledger, Chief Executive of the Belfast-based Arts and Disability Forum (ADF) which has managed the scheme on behalf of both Arts Councils since the year 2000.

 

The ADF received the news from the Acting Head of Arts Participation of the Arts Council of Ireland. The Council’s letter stated that, as a result of an 11% reduction in its own funding, it has decided to explore alternative ways of meeting the needs of the arts and disability sector in Ireland.

 

Ms Ledger thanked the Arts Council of Ireland for its support over the years, adding that the scheme had been valuable in promoting the careers of disabled and deaf artists.

 

She said: “Of course we understand the pressures on funders but it is sad that the scheme is ending. The ADAI programme has been extremely valuable in providing dedicated year-round support for disabled and deaf artists who are on a professional career path. It has enabled them to compete in a very tough market.

 

She continued “Artists from both sides of the border who have received ADAI bursaries have gone on to win awards, commissions, recording or publishing deals and major grants. For example one of ‘our’ artists was shortlisted for the Hennessey Literature award last year, two albums were released, a Wellcome Trust award was granted and artist who got started with an ADAI grant has won no less than seven international awards in the past couple of years! The funding loss is not about supporting us as an organisation; the ADAI funding wasn’t about us! It levelled the playing field and enabled talented artists to overcome barriers that they face simply because they happen to be disabled or deaf.

 

The ADAI scheme itself is a past recipient of an Aisling award for cross-border co-operation.

 

Chris Ledger pledged that the ADF will continue in its work to promote excellence among artists who are disabled or deaf, saying that the ADF is now in discussions with the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, exploring new possibilities for Northern Ireland artists.

 

She added: “We are saddened that this important cross border work has been lost but the ADF will continue to keep in contact with artists in the Republic and even though we can no longer offer money we will still showcase their work through our gallery space and events like Bounce! Arts Festival.”

 

Ms Ledger started to break the news to artists at the launch of ‘Ebb and Flow’, a new exhibition of landscape paintings at the ADF Gallery in Royal Avenue by talented visual artist Cathy Henderson, a previous recipient of an ADAI grant. Ms Henderson is an ideal example of how disabled artists have forged positive relationships on both sides of the border and gone on to thrive.

 

Born in London and living in Dublin, in 2010 she was awarded a commission from the Museums of Northern Ireland and also an RoI Artist in the Community Award. Since 1998 Cathy has taken part four times in the Great Northern Arts Festival in Canada and in 2011, with funding from Culture Ireland, she held a solo exhibition of relief prints in Whitehorse, capital of the Yukon Territory. She recently completed a commissioned project with the Dublin painter Robert Ballagh to design a commemorative artwork celebrating  the centenary of the 1913 Lockout and the establishment of the ITGWU.

 

Messages of support for the Arts & Disability Forum’s work can be sent to chris@adf.ie.

 

Notes to Editors

 

The ADF has received a total of 390 applications since the ADAI scheme began in 2000. From that, 218 projects from both jurisdictions have been awarded a total of £526,274.

 

For more information: contact Gary Kelly on gary@kellypr.co.uk, 02893340275 or 07581282723